Resettlement

  • Budget Planning

    In 2018, IRCC issued RAP rates for each province that sponsoring groups must use to generate their budget. 

    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to receive a template specific to your province and family composition. In your email, please include:

    • the name of your community, and
    • the names & birthdates of each member of the family you are sponsoring.
    • any other information that would affect the budget - i.e. pregnancy, health concerns, etc.
  • Faith Community Church

    Faith Community Church begins a sponsorship of a refugee family.At this point, it is still a waiting game but way more so for Ruth and Joseph* and their three children.

    We first began the process of sharing the vision for this with the congregation of Faith Community Church in January 2017. It was formally agreed to by the congregation in February.

    We worked closely with our SAH (the Alliance Church) and their representative Hannatu as she helped us work through the thorough template they have crafted for sponsorship. That process took us about two months as we emailed back and forth with Ruth & Joseph getting them to fill in their documentation even as we did ours. After the initial review of all our paperwork, our SAH then sent the file on to Immigration Canada. This was an invaluable time saver as it virtually eliminated all the mistakes we might have made and saved the time of resending.

  • Grace Church, Newmarket

    grace churchOn April 7, 2018 I had the pleasure of chatting with Andrea Bowman of Grace Church, Newmarket about their church's refugee sponsorship experience. Grace Church worked with Mennonite Central Committee as their SAH to bring a family of 8 from Syria via Beirut, Lebanon, to Newmarket. Unfortunately, just before the family was about to travel, their youngest child died and understandably, their departure from Lebanon was delayed. In October 2017, the family of 7 touched down at YYZ and their journey to resettle in Canada began.

    RSI: How did this particular sponsorship journey begin for Grace?

  • Highlights from 2019 PSR Annual Dashboard

    canada logoThe Private Sponsorship of Refugees (PSR) Annual Dashboard is produced by IRCC. The report provides a snapshot of what was achieved in the program in the preceding year. Highlights from the 2019 edition are below.

  • How Can Churches Help Refugees?

    An Evangelical Fellowship of Canada Podcast with Brian Dyck of the Mennonite Central Committee, discussing insights, practical tips, and some of the theology that will help churches engage with refugees.

  • Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP)

    The Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP) provides limited, temporary coverage of health-care benefits for resettled refugees.

    • IFHP is funded by IRCC and administered by Medavie Blue Cross.
    • A Certificate of Eligibility is issued upon arrival by Canada Border Service Agency and will be given to the newcomers at their Port of Entry.
    • To use IFHP coverage, you must present the certificate to the service provider.
    • Coverage lasts 12 months.
  • JAS Profile #19-0080

    calgaryADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Calgary, AB
    COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Iraq
    FAMILY SIZE: One

    The 37 year old newcomer arrived in Canada in March 2018 with her mother, sister-in-law and two nephews (JAS profile #19-0081).

    The newcomer is a survivor of trauma and torture and has suffered from tremendous psychological stress and mental health issues.

    She is responsible for taking care of her elderly mother, who also suffers from mental health issues and has physical health problems, along with her two younger nephews and shares the responsibility of running the household with her sister-in-law.

    A sponsor would be able to provide the necessary emotional and social support to reduce the newcomer’s feelings of isolation and help her access community resources, increasing her confidence and independence which could relieve some of the pressure of caring for her mother.

  • JAS Profile #19-0335

    JAS 19 0836ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Winnipeg, MB
    COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Syria
    FAMILY SIZE: Nine

    A Syrian man, aged 42, accompanied by his spouse and their seven children, has completed six years of education and has worked as a plumber and pipe fitter. He is fluent in Arabic and has some English language training.

    His spouse is a homemaker. The family has received settlement support. Six of the couple’s children are registered for school, and one is fully dependent on his parents.

    Medical needs: The father has withdrawn from English language training due to the ongoing medical needs of their youngest child. This has prevented the family from engaging in other settlement services and accessing various community resources.

    Sponsor assistance: A sponsor could: give the family a support system to help with their daily challenges; allow them to dedicate the time necessary to develop their English language skills; help them to fully connect and integrate within their local community; provide informal English practice; and, assist with managing the child’s ongoing medical appointments.

  • JAS Profile #19-0345

    toronto nightADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Toronto, ON
    COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Iraq
    FAMILY SIZE: Two

    The family consists of a 20 year old sister and her 7 year old sister. The eldest sister is raising her younger sister and is the primary caregiver of her elderly grandmother and her brother (JAS profile #19-0346). The brother has impaired cognitive disabilities.

    The eldest sister would like to attend English language classes but is unable to do so as she is responsible for her younger sister, grandmother and brother. A sponsor would be able to assist the eldest sister with practicing English, developing her computer skills, connecting her with the local community and providing social and informal emotional support to the family.

  • JAS Profile #19-0409

    JAS 19 0836ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Hamilton, ON
    COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Somalia
    FAMILY SIZE: One

    A Somali woman, aged 26, who arrived in Canada in late 2018, is hospitalized due to a disability.

    Medical needs: She suffers from an untreatable muscle disorder which will worsen over time. She is paralyzed, unable to move her arms and is slowly losing the use of her hands. She cannot go anywhere by herself. The hospital does not offer English training.

    Sponsor assistance: A sponsor could: reduce her feelings of isolation and loneliness through social, psychological, and emotional support; introduce her to the community to allow her to expand her social connections and build positive relationships with new people; and, informally help her practice English.

  • JAS Profile #19-0591

    london ontarioADDITIONAL INFORMATION: London, ON
    COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Syria
    FAMILY SIZE: One

    A 62 year old senior newcomer widow with health issues is living alone in Canada. The newcomer is a survivor of trauma and torture and is considered to be a Woman at Risk.

    The newcomer has trouble getting to her medical appointments due to vision loss and a sponsor would be able to assist her by helping her attend her medical appointments and by helping her become more comfortable with the public transit system. The newcomer also feels isolated and a sponsor would be able to assist with overcoming this by helping her to integrate into her community by connecting her with local services, providing emotional support and practicing English with her.

  • JAS Profile #19-0836

    JAS 19 0836ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Calgary, AB
    COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Syria
    FAMILY SIZE: 4

    This single mother from Syria and her three children arrived in Calgary in late 2018. The children have adapted well to school and are learning English.

    Special needs: The mother struggles with prior trauma, and has difficulty in caring for her children while adjusting to life in Canada.

    Medical needs: Each of the children have asthma, requiring frequent medical appointments. The youngest daughter suffers from a blood disorder, which requires additional medical support. The mother suffers from back pain, which makes it difficult for her to attend resettlement programs and language classes. She feels isolated and lonely, and has difficulty sleeping.

    Sponsor assistance: With the support of a sponsor, the mother could focus on her own integration by attending language classes, counselling sessions for past trauma and employment programs. A sponsor could help her understand and navigate the health care system.

  • Life as a Newcomer

    Starting over again in a new country is difficult enough without the trauma of having to flee your home because of war or persecution. So many of these recent newcomers have had to leave family behind. They have suffered untold injustices and have been faced with unthinkable choices. These are some of their stories as they begin a new life here in Canada.

  • Matching Funds in Manitoba

    naomi house refugee transitional housingThrough our connections with the Baptist General Conference, our Manitoba churches have a unique opportunity to partner with a Constituent Group in Winnipeg to sponsor Pakistani refugees who are stranded in Thailand. The group in Winnipeg is known by both Lorne Meisner, and Tim & Susan Davis.

  • Monitoring Reports

    family2Now that the sponsored refugees have arrived, all the work that went into settlement and budget planning will be put to the test. Is it a good plan? Are the expectations realistic?

    As with every successful endeavor, there must be an informed plan or course of action. And as with every successful endeavor, that plan must be flexible enough to bend to real life, with real people. To help CGs navigate the adjustments that are to be expected once they move from theory to the real thing, we require the CG Representative submit a quarterly report designed to provide us with the practical information we need, and to create room to notice potential issues as they arise.

  • Our Stories

    In the Fall of 2015, AGC churches began a journey together into the heartbreaking world of refugees, and the blessed opportunities we have as Canadians to sponsor them. These are our stories. 

  • Permanent Residency and Permanent Resident (PR) Card

    Permanent Residency:

    Resettled refugees become permanent residents (PRs) the moment they sign their ‘Confirmation of Permanent Residence’ document at the airport. As Permanent Residents they:

    • Access the same social benefits and health care coverage as Canadian citizens.
    • Do not require a permit to study or work.
    • Are protected under Canadian law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
    • Have responsibilities, including paying taxes and respecting all federal, provincial and municipal laws.
  • Post-Sponsorship Transition

    Post-sponsorship transition helpIt is essential that when the sponsorship period ends, the newcomer’s financial dependency on the sponsors must end too. While it may take much longer to truly settle and feel at home here, sponsors must work to support a transition to self-sufficiency. Community connections and friendships often continue indefinitely.

    Supporting Independence from the Beginning:

    Take active steps throughout the sponsorship to give newcomers the tools to do things for themselves (even when it might be easier to do things for them) including:

  • Refugee Sponsorship Programs

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada currently offers three different opportunities for Sponsorship Agreement Holders (SAHs) or their Constituency Groups (CGs) to sponsor refugees. A person can only be considered a refugee if they are outside of their country of origin — having fled their homeland and unable to return because of a well-founded fear of persecution based on race, religion, political opinion, nationality or membership in a particular social group, or because of war or severe human rights abuses.

  • Refugee Sponsorship Reinvigorates Churches

    efc lynn scurfieldThe EFC (Evangelical Fellowship of Canada) has published an article written by Joel Arndt in Faith Today, Nov/Dec 2017 that recounts the impact that churches have had on resettling refugees through both the Private Sponsorship Program and the Blended Visa Office Referral Program. 

    Looking back on what some churches have accomplished thus far, it doesn't seem to matter whether the communities are large or small, whether there are ample resources or no budget for sponsorship at all, God's people have stepped out in faith and prayer to help resettle more than 3,500 refugees in Canada. 

    And the consensus from those who have walked this journey is that the blessing of sponsorship goes both ways. Yes, the new-comers receive a new lease on living - the opportunities for education, and simply being able to live life without the fear of war and all its atrocities - but the churches have been blessed as well, even with the challenges.

    You can read the full article here.

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